• Users Online: 5923
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 47-53

Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy: Subgroup analysis from Riyadh mother and baby multicenter cohort study (RAHMA)


1 Research Chair of Evidence-Based Healthcare and Knowledge Translation; Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Research Chair of Evidence-Based Healthcare and Knowledge Translation, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Department of tropical health, High Institute of Public Health, Alexandria, Egypt
4 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
5 Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland – Bahrain, College of Medicine, Al Sayh, Bahrain

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Amel Fayed
Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. P.O. Box 84428, Postal Code 11671
Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/joah.joah_133_21

Rights and Permissions

OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of anemia among pregnant women in Riyadh and to examine its association with adverse pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: This study is a subgroup analysis from Riyadh mother and baby multicenter cohort study. Participants were grouped into four groups according to hemoglobin level: nonanemic (≥11.0 g/100 ml), mild (10–10.9 g/100 ml), moderate (7.0–9.9 g/100 ml), and severe anemia (<7.0 g/100 ml). Regression analyses were conducted to extrapolate the predicted probability (PP) for pregnancy outcomes. RESULTS: Out of 10,600 participants, 3261 (30.76%) were anemic; 1729 (16.3%), 1520 (14.3%), and 12 (0.1%) had mild, moderate, and severe anemia, respectively. The odds of anemia was higher in younger mothers (odds ratio [OR] = 0.94, confidence interval [CI]: 0.91–0.94) and in primiparous (OR = 1.01, CI: 0.90–1.14), while attendants of antenatal care and those who received iron supplements were less likely to be anemic (OR = 0.93, CI: 0.82–1.06) and (OR = 0.92, CI: 0.77–1.09), respectively. There was a significant increase in the odds of lower APGAR with the decreased hemoglobin; an increment of maternal hemoglobin by 1 g/100 ml decreased the likelihood of APGAR scores <7 by 9% (OR = 0.91, CI: 0.83–0.99). The PP showed a decrease in preterm birth (PTB) rate from 8% (CI: 6%–9%) to 6.5% (CI: 5%–8%), low birth weight (LBW) rate from 12% (CI 10%–13%) to 11% (CI: 9%–12%), stillbirth rate from 1.3% (CI: 0.7%–2.1%) to 1.1% (CI: 0.7%–1.6%), and maternal admission to intensive care unit (ICU) from 0.8% (CI: 0.2%–1.5%) to 0.2% (CI: 0.06%–0.4%), with increase of maternal hemoglobin from 7 g/100 ml to 15 g/100 ml. CONCLUSION: More than a third of the pregnant women in Riyadh had mild-to-moderate anemia. The odds of anemia increased in primipara, younger mothers, and those without antenatal care or iron supplementation. PP showed that anemia is associated with low APGAR scores, LBW, PTB stillbirth, and maternal admission to ICU.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed162    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded19    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal